Change the culture of working groups, institutions, and society

Change the culture of working groups, institutions, and society

Changing the culture of any institution is a hard task to implement and sustain.  People are creatures of habit and they select those that we want to associate with, be influenced by, and who they want to alienate.  This is not communal behavior, so when a project like this one comes about some easy prodding must be used to break those natural barriers people put up.  This is done through collaboration and making agreements to be open-minded to what others feel and think.  A good place to start is in the classroom.  “Encouraging students to reach out to each other to solve problems and share knowledge not only builds collaboration skills, it leads to deeper learning and understanding” (Davis, 2012), a belief held at The College Preparatory School in Oakland, California.  But this level of communication must be supported by trust, and trust comes from building and working together jointly finding solutions.  In this project the classroom is the point of interest.  Students must feel safe, respected, engaged, connected and supported to establish a positive learning environment.  There cannot be too many distractions from communication and collaboration, they must relate to each other and the teachers.

They really do want to teach each other.

“Children have a natural proclivity to teach, help, cooperate, and empathize with others, and these interactions can have positive benefits for children’s emotional, social, and cognitive development” (Jellison, Draper, Brown, 2017).  However, when there are social imbalances in their learning environment these natural proclivities can falter. So what are some of the reasons for there to be a breakdown in this pristine learning environment?

Teaches play a pivotal role as the facilitator in this participatory project, at least that is what needs to be the case to ensure that everyone has a voice, and decisions are made collectively.  Teacher must show all in the process how to be culturally responsive.  Teachers should start by having an attitude of respect for cultural differences, a belief that all students are capable of learning, and a sense of efficacy (Irvine, 2002).

These are just a few considerations that promote responsiveness in a communal way something that must be in place before the PAR process is to proceed, before the problems can be identified and the first round of solutions are implemented.

 

 

References

Davis, M. (December 5, 2012) How Collaborative Learning Leads to Student Success. edutopia. From: https://www.edutopia.org/stw-collaborative-learning-college-prep

Irvine, J.,J. (2002) In Search of Wholeness, African American Teachers and Their Culturally Specific Classroom Practices. PALGRAVE. 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y.10010. DOI 10.1057/9780230107182

 

 

 

 


References

Jellison, J. A., Draper, E. A., & Brown, L. S. (2017). Learning Together: The Instinct to Do Good and Peer-Assisted Strategies That Work. Music Educators Journal104(2), 15-20. doi:10.1177/0027432117713823